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Previous Exhibitions

Into the Woods

Into the Woods

Gallery 3

02 December 2017 until 20 January 2018

A small curated exhibition of makers who delve deep into the woods to celebrate the beasts and insects who inhabit it. In the shadow of the trees something magical is happening. Often the setting for dark and mysterious tales the woods are the site of transformation and the home to a vast array of creatures both real and imagined. Work will include ceramics, textiles, print, mixed media sculpture and curiosities. 

Naomi Greaves

Naomi Greaves

Craft Showcase

02 December 2017 until 20 January 2018

Naomi Greaves has always been a collector of unusual things, most of which can be found  in her studio. While some items hold sentimental attachments, others she  purchased can be quite peculiar and macabre. A large part of her collection is a library of old books full of engravings and woodcuts.

Combining images from her book collection with antique papers carefully sourced and purchased, together with her passion for print, Naomi's work embraces her inspirations.

Claire Gent

Claire Gent

Jewellery showcase

02 December 2017 until 20 January 2018

Fashion meets nature. This is how Claire describes her jewellery. She combine anodised aluminium with sterling silver to create several contemporary ranges that feature flora and fauna, and reflect her love for pattern and illustration.

Designing and making is part of who she is , and with jewellery she has found a discipline that will take a lifetime to learn. Claire's pieces involve many processes including painting, immersion dyeing, forging, piercing, and riveting. The creation of a product life cycle, from thumbnail sketch, to seeing the finished design in a gallery display, is to her immensely satisfying.

Gwent Wildlife Trust

Gwent Wildlife Trust

Photography Competition Winners

Cafe Gallery

02 December 2017 until 20 January 2018

The Gwent Wildlife Trust photography competition encourages everyone to capture some of their favourite wildlife moments on film. Each year brings new creativity and techniques, which when applied produces some beautifully atmospheric results. The entries demonstrate a great deal of skill and, in many cases, huge amounts of patience showing how committed people are to observing and recording the wonderful wildlife in Gwent.

Still

Still

Ceramics from Anne Gibbs

Main Gallery

07 October 2017 until 18 November 2017

Anne Gibbs takes the time to stop and contemplate what she sees and experiences. She is minded to observe what often goes unnoticed, be it a tree on a hill we might see every season or a road junction we might pass everyday. Anne recognises the beauty in things and also acknowledges the pain, both often unexpected. Thus in her fine ceramic work we see calm delicacy often contrasted against rough, found objects. A metal pin might perforate a smooth surface, a sharp edge might be left on an object we could otherwise use.

Anne models and casts work in bone china, using a bright palette of colours. The sculptural ceramics she presents, sometimes in pairs and sometimes in large groups, are punctuated with objects she has collected. Anne’s work maps her life journey so far and does so without presuming what we, as viewers, might see in it.

Still is a chance for us to share and celebrate a wonderful new body of work by Anne as it tours to venues across Wales. The exhibition is accompanied by a variety of engagement activities.

A Mission Gallery National Touring Exhibition curated by Ceri Jones.

 

‘Building Works: Traces’

‘Building Works: Traces’

A selection of work from Geoff Bradford's photography practice

Galley 3

07 October 2017 until 18 November 2017

The subject of Geoff Bradford's photographic practice is the ordinary, overlooked and common-place and recognisable to everyone. It references the ‘made’ world and, though absent, a human presence is implied. 

As an artist/maker, he has lately considered the photograph to be a physical object as well as an image to be handled as well as viewed – one of the reasons for their relatively small size.